Tag Archives: management

Effective Talent Management

There is no doubt that more and more organisations are implementing talent management strategies and frameworks. However whilst talent management is fast becoming a strategic priority for many organisations, Collings & Mellahi (2009) suggest that the topic of talent management lacks a consistent definition and is still largely undefined. Literature reviews reveal that one reason for this is that the empirical question of “what is talent?” has been left unanswered.

The term talent has undergone considerable change over the years. It was originally used in the ancient world to denote a unit of money, before adopting a meaning of inclination or desire in the 13th century, and natural ability or aptitude in the 14th century (Tansley 2011, as cited in Meyers, Woerkom, & Dries, 2013). Today’s dictionary definition of talent is “someone who has a natural ability to be good at something, especially: without being taught” (Cambridge Dictionaries Online, 2014).  This definition implies that talent is innate rather than acquired. This holds important implications for the application of talent management in practice. For example, it influences whether we should focus more on the identification/selection of talent or the development of talent.

Talent management is defined as “an integrated, dynamic process, which enables organisations to define, acquire, develop, and retain the talent that it needs to meet its strategic objectives” (Bersin, 2008).

Integrated talent management implies we take a more holistic approach; starting with the identification of key positions and capabilities required which contribute to an organisations sustainable competitive advantage (Collings & Mellahi, 2009). Equipped with this information we are better able to gather talent intelligence to help determine capability gaps, identify individual potential, and any areas for development.  Talent intelligence and performance tools capable of gathering this type of information include: well validated psychometric assessments, 360° surveys, engagement surveys, post appointment and exit interviews etc. Strategic and integrated talent management is not only essential in the current market, but provides an opportunity to be pro-active rather than reactive in addressing your critical talent needs.

We suggest that key components of an effective talent management process would include:

  1. A clear understanding of the organisations current and future strategies.
  2. Knowledge of key positions and the associated knowledge, skills, and abilities required (job analysis and test validation projects can assist here).
  3. Objective metrics that identify gaps between the current and required talent to drive business success.
  4. A plan designed to close these gaps with targeted actions such as talent acquisition and talent development.
  5. Integration with HR systems and processes across the employee lifecycle.

What is clear is that talent management is becoming more and more important as organisations fight for the top talent in a tight job market. Key to success will be identifying what ‘talent’ looks like for your organisation and working to ensure they are fostered through the entire employment lifecycle.

 

Meyers, M. C., van Woerkom, M., & Dries, N. (2013). Talent—Innate or acquired? Theoretical considerations and their implications for talent management. Human Resource Management Review, 23(4), 305-321.

Collings, D. G., & Mellahi, K. (2009). Strategic talent management: A review and research agenda. Human Resource Management Review, 19(4), 304-313.

Bersin Associates. (2008). Talent Management Factbook.

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Outplacement: What are ‘Employers of Choice’ doing in the Face of Job Cuts?

With the current downturn in the mining industry, management are making tough decisions regarding asset optimisation, cost management, risk management and profitability. Naturally, head count is being scrutinised more closely than ever. What isn’t hitting the headlines is what genuine ‘employers of choice’ are doing to support their exiting workforce and their remaining staff.

A leading Global Engineering Consultancy recently made a corporate decision to discontinue a once profitable consulting arm of their Australian operation. With increased competition, reduction in mining demand and eroding profit margin a very difficult restructure resulted in the redundancy of 40 national engineering roles. As an employee-owned organisation that lives its company values which include Teamwork, Caring, Integrity, and Excellence, this decision was not made easily. Throughout the decision-making process Management was naturally mindful to uphold these values, and BeilbyOPRA Consulting was engaged to provide Outplacement and Career Transition services to individuals for a period of up to 3 months.

The objectives of the project were to ensure that individual staff were adequately supported through this period of transition and ultimately, to gain alternate employment as quickly as possible.

BeilbyOPRA’s Solution:

BeilbyOPRA Consulting’s solution was led by a team of Organisational Psychologists and supported by Consultants being on site in seven locations throughout Australia on the day that the restructure was communicated to employees. Consultants provided immediate support to displaced individuals through an initial face-to-face meeting, where the Career Transition program was introduced.  From here, individuals chose whether or not to participate in the program, the key topics of which included:

  • Taking Stock – Understanding and effectively managing the emotional reactions to job change.
  • Assessment – Identifying skills and achievements through psychometric assessment and feedback sessions.
  • Preparation – Learning about time management skills; developing effective marketing tools; resume writing and cover letter preparation; telephone techniques.
  • Avenues to Job Hunting – Tapping into the hidden job market; responding to advertisements; connecting with recruitment consultants.
  • Interviews – Formats; preparation; how to achieve a successful interview.
  • Financial Advice – BeilbyOPRA partnered with a national financial services firm to offer participants complimentary financial advice.

 The Outcome:

Of the 40 individuals whose positions were made redundant:

  • 78% engaged in the first day of the program.
  • Of this group, 48% participated in the full program, as the remainder only utilised one or two of the services before securing employment.
  • 83% of those who participated in the full program gained employment within 3 months

Some of the learning outcomes from this project for organisations include:

  • Conduct thorough due diligence before committing to the restructure.
  • Create a steering committee to oversee the redundancy process.
  • Ensure accurate, relevant and timely communication is provided to all those involved.
  • Have a trial run of the entire process.
  • Have a dedicated internal project manager to facilitate the outplacement project.
  • Ensure that the staff who remain employed with your organisation, ‘the survivors’, are informed and supported.

In summary, the value of outplacement support was best captured by the National HR Manager who stated:

“It is about supporting staff and upholding our values through good and difficult times. From a legal, cultural and branding perspective outplacement support is critical. As the market changes we will hope to re-employ some of the affected staff and some will become clients in the future’.

You, lead? You don’t even know where you’re going!

At OPRA we spend a lot of time thinking and talking about leadership. We work to help people become more effective leaders, enabling them to better understand their staff, relate to them, guide them, motivate, and influence them. Likewise, literature abounds with theories and models of what makes an exceptionally effective leader. However the majority of these theories, and the interventions you’ll see discussed on LinkedIn or tradeshows typically fail to address one key component of being an effective leader. What’s missing is that in order to truly, effectively lead other people, you first need to be leading yourself.

Leading yourself – it sounds simple enough, set SMART goals that will stretch and extend you, and exercise self-control to keep you on-track and motivated, right? In reality, it’s even more straightforward than that. While self-discipline and long-term objectives no doubt help you shape and guide your life, it’s important to make sure that your goals and the path towards them involve the things you value most. Doing things for their own sake because of the enjoyment, pleasure, or fulfilment they bring us is referred to as ‘intrinsic motivation’, and it is this intrinsic motivation that leads us to love our work.

In his book “The Spirit of Leadership”, Dr Peter Cammock, a leadership and management academic/researcher at the University of Canterbury, explains that for work to be truly meaningful and deeply (existentially?) satisfying, we need to match an external call (the opportunities) with an internal call (things we appreciate and value). Once these are in alignment, we move from simply having a job or career to finding our calling. Now, ‘calling’ is one of those terms that makes me grimace every time I use it, but it’s important to recognise that while ‘calling’ is usually associated with people who make huge sacrifices to chase some higher cause, it doesn’t always have to be this grand or audacious. In “The Spirit of Leadership”, Cammock discusses 16 ‘ordinary’ people who made changes in their lives to ensure that every day they were working towards or involved in something that they loved, and the hugely positive impact this had on their lives and ability to perform their jobs. Admittedly, some of these people made massive sacrifices, however others ‘tweaked’ a few key things and in return have found their lives become immensely fulfilling.

Sure, this seems like simple advice, and it is likely easy advice to give that’s hard to follow. But even just thinking about what you could change is the first step towards improvement. Don’t let guilt get in the way of happiness and fulfilment either. Instead, realise that this is not selfishness – it’s taking care of yourself so you can better perform your role, or fulfil your calling (grimace). Think of this post as being like an airline safety briefing – you should put your own oxygen mask on first before you attend to others!

Finally, it is important to remember that leading yourself is merely the foundation for exceptional leadership. However with this foundation is in place, then you can tend to the other important leadership components, like strategic thinking, motivating and engaging your team, and being emotionally intelligent, comfortable in the knowledge that you’re already a great leader.

Reference: Cammock, P. (2008). The Spirit of Leadership: Building the Personal Foundations of Extraordinary Leadership. Christchurch, New Zealand: Leadership Press Ltd.